Product Reuse, Recycling, Recovery Disposal

We understand that being a steward of the environment means facilitating the safe reuse, recycling, recovery, and disposal of our products. These resources provide important information on how to manage the products in our portfolio, from chemicals to equipment, at the end of their useful life.

WEEE and RoHS

European Union (EU) WEEE and RoHS Directives focus on electrical and electronic equipment and require strategies for waste recycling/management (product end-of-life).

Photochemicals and Containers

Manage your photochemicals and containers in a safe, environmentally sound, and cost effective manner.

Equipment

Kodak Alaris recommends the recycling of used electronic equipment. Recycling promotes resource conservation and reduces potential impacts to the environment.

Kiosk and APEX Media

Manage your thermal donor ribbon and thermal photo prints in a safe, environmentally sound, and cost effective manner.

Thermal Donor Ribbon
Thermal ribbons consist of cyan, magenta, yellow and clear coloured patches coated on a thin (~12 micron) polyethylene terephthalate plastic (PET, SPI plastic resin code 1) film spooled on 2 plastic cores. Although used ribbons are suitable for recycling, since they contain latent images we recommend incineration with energy recovery as the most appropriate treatment and to maintain security of the images. Companies used should provide a certificate of destruction. If incineration with energy recovery is unavailable, incineration without energy recovery is the next best environmental option. Finally, if no incineration facilities are available, used ribbons are non hazardous and can be landfilled.

Thermal Photo Prints
Wastes or unwanted Kodak Alaris thermal paper prints cannot be reused nor are they suitable for conventional paper recycling. The prints are made of fibre-based paper (~150 micron) coated on both sides with very thin layers of polypropylene (PP) and polyethylene (PE). These coatings protect the prints making them water-resistant, wipeable and stain resistant. Hence, their composition makes incineration with energy recovery the best environmental option for waste treatment. If incineration with energy recovery is unavailable, incineration without energy recovery is the next best environmental option. Finally, if no incineration facilities are available, these papers are non hazardous and can be landfilled.

Photographic Film and Paper

Manage your photographic film and paper in a safe, environmentally sound, and cost effective manner.

Both types of modern film base (acetate and polyester) can be recovered, though the facilities for doing so may not exist in all locations. The economics of the recovery process, as well as the potential environmental impact, may make the transport of waste film over long distances impractical. If local recovery is not possible, de-silvered film should be disposed of by incineration with energy recovery. If suitable incineration facilities are unavailable, the waste may be disposed of to landfill without risk of adverse environmental effects.Waste photographic paper is not generally recoverable. Most papers are coated with a very thin layer of polythene to control water absorption and speed drying, and should not therefore be mixed with other waste paper destined for conventional paper recovery.

Waste photographic paper should be disposed of by incineration with energy recovery. If suitable incineration facilities are unavailable; the waste may be disposed of to landfill without risk of adverse environmental effects.